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Thursday, September 10, 2009

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I promise not to comment sporadically over the next three years every time the Beaker Folk hit another nail on the head, but speaking as an appreciative former student of Richard Kidd's '... and Religion' courses, the recent piece on 'The Science and Religion Game' (16 Sept)certainly hits the spot.

The Basic Idea

"The players take up a position on either side of the fence. They take it in turns to throw their cards over it. The aim of each card is to trump the other team's previous card. For example, if the Science player plays the "Spanish Inquisition" card, the Religion team might play the "Darwinian eugenics" card. Likewise a "Homophobia" card might be met by a "Gays will burn in Hell" card - or possibly by a "My vicar's gay actually, but he just doesn't shout about it" card. Although the latter card is rare, and only available in the limited Edition "C of E" game pack, where you're allowed to sit on the fence."

Special Cards

"The "Voltaire converted on his deathbed" card is of doubtful worth.

The "Bible says" card is worth either a million points or none, depending upon which side of the fence you are.

The "Bono" card scores highly but everyone's a bit embarrassed to play it.


"as, for the record, was also the case in my previous workplace"

I can't think what you might mean, Archdeacon Irene never, ever used 50 billion different symbols in a single act of worship... As for tea-lights, ribbons, grapes, African cloth, prancing about in circles Enya recordings and the like, no, never saw/heard any of those... much. Ah, my abiding memory must that bizarre service where we all had to throw our keys into the middle - and the planners (evidently) didn't realise what this looked like... (to the pure, as my dad used to say).

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